Canadian group The East Pointers come to Barton’s Ropery Hall

Blurring the lines between traditional Celtic tunes and popular music, The East Pointers bring their “smart maritime folk” to Barton upon Humber’s Ropery Hall next Friday (February 1)

The East Pointers are three young men from Canada whose talent and penchant for traditional Celtic tunes of decades past greatly belie their respective ages.

Formed in 2014, each member of The East Pointers – banjoist/vocalist/step-dancer Koady Chaisson, fiddle player/vocalist Tim Chaisson, and guitarist/vocalist Jake Charron – is an accomplished musician in his own right, and their union produces a blend of Celtic tunes, songs and step-dances molded into something uniquely Canadian through a history which goes back generations.

“The group writes about real life, sketching out its joys and sorrows in vivid strokes,” said Liz Bennet of The Ropewalk. “Their authenticity makes their instrumental tunes practically cartwheel and infuses their lyric-driven songs with poignancy.”

“It’s no surprise that with their dazzling musicianship and wildly entertaining live shows The East Pointers have connected with audiences right across the globe, making new, original roots music the hippest, most vibrant thing going,” she went on.

Their second album, What We Leave Behind, reflects on the traditions of Canadian Celtic music, where it comes from, and what it means to the people.

With a captivating balance between their traditional-sounding instrumental tunes, and catchy radio-ready songs, The East Pointers reach out with open arms to a wide range of listeners, inviting them to discover a new love of folk music.

The gig starts at 8pm and tickets to see The East Pointers cost £15 in advance or £17 on the door.  Advance tickets can be bought online at www.roperyhall.co.uk, in person from The Ropewalk’s Craft Gallery or by calling 01652 660380.

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New programme at Ropery Hall

The new season at Barton upon Humber’s Ropery Hall gets underway early next month with the return of the 3hattrio playing the distinctive sounds of  American Desert Music.

The gig, on Thursday, September 5, heralds the start of four months of non-stop music, comedy, theatre and film at the Maltkiln Road venue.

Included in the programme are old favourites such as Snake Davis, playing with his band in September and then returning on the last Sunday from September to November with invited guests as well as playing out 2019 with his band Alligator Shoes.

Other highlights include comedy in the form of Angela Barnes with her sell-out Edinburgh Fringe Show, Rose-Tinted and Tom Binns and his alter-ego Ivan Brackenbury as well as the Barnstormers Comedy Club.

Hue and Cry will be touching down at Ropery Hall in October as part of the group’s 30th anniversary celebrations while the Budapest Café Orchestra will be celebrating its 10th anniversary in November.

There’s a strong representation of theatre too and one production, 12 Silk Handkerchiefs, Songs & Storytelling, is particularly close to home as Reg Meuross’s moving work of social and political history, inspired by Brian W. Lavery’s book The Headscarf Revolutionaries, opens a window on Hull’s Hessle Road fishing community and fighting fishwife Lillian Billoca’s successful campaign for improved trawler safety in the aftermath of the 1968 Triple Trawler Disaster.  Reg’s powerful songs are interwoven with narration from Brian W. Lavery and rare archive footage from the time the ships went down.

As well as Night Terrors with Gerard Logan, based on the spine-tingling tales of the supernatural from E.F. Benson’s brilliant collection of ghost stories, and Shackleton’s Carpenter telling the tale of the ill-fated voyage by the explorer to Antarctica, Robert Ross, comedy historian, will be saluting perennial Christmas treats in an affectionate celebration.  Expect Laurel and Hardy, The Two Ronnies, Morecambe and Wise and more!

There’s also monthly quiz nights and a film programme of matinees and evening screenings.

For all of the autumn programme go to www.roperyhall.co.uk

By janetuplin |

John Otway and the Big Band 

From the age of 9, John Otway knew he wanted to be a pop star but had to wait until 1977 and the rise of punk before his dream of fame and fortune would finally become a reality. Having caught the eye of the producers of the BBC’s Old Grey Whistle Test, Otway’s performance on that show would grab the attention of the watching audience. Otway, ever the showman, decided to jump on to the amplifier of his colleague during a performance of Bob Lind’s Cheryl’s Going Home. (Un)fortunately for Otway, he misjudged his leap and sent Wild Willy Barrett’s amplifier tumbling as he crashed down straddling the box under the amp.

Sales of Otway’s sixth single, the half-spoken love song Really Free increased dramatically and reached number 27 in the UK Singles Chart. An appearance on the BBC’s flagship music programme Top of the Pops, where Otway & Barrett were introduced by Elton John later, Otway was finally a star. It would however, be his greatest success for some time.

Despite numerous attempts to get back into the charts, Otway would have to wait 25 years for his next taste of chart success. In 2002, Otway achieved what he desired the most – a second hit. A concerted publicity campaign saw Otway reach number 9 with the disco pastiche Bunsen Burner and a second appearance on Top of the Pops.

To celebrate his 60th birthday in 2012, Otway produced his debut movie titled Otway the Movie: The Story of Rock n Roll’s Greatest Failure that was voted the 2nd best film of the year in a poll of its readers conducted by The Guardian newspaper.

Following a successful Kickstarter campaign, Otway took his band to the Caribbean island of Montserrat to record a new album, Montserrat. The album would be the first to be recorded on the island by an international artist since The Rolling Stones recorded Steel Wheels in 1989. Produced by Grammy-award winner Chris Birkett and recorded at Olveston House – the former home of Sir George Martin, it was released to critical acclaim in May 2017.

By richardhatfield |

Snake Davis and his Alligator Shoes

A big nine piece brassy, saxy and soulful band playing music that grabs your heart and moves your feet.

The original, first and never forgotten ‘60s soul band formed by Snake, with Dave Bowie and Mark Creswell back in 1979 in Leeds, rises from the ashes playing Motown, Stax, Atlantic, Junior Walker, Otis Redding…

From Curtis Mayfield’s ‘Move on Up’ through Smokey’s ‘Tears of a Clown’ to Sam and Dave’s ‘Hold on I’m coming’ and Yvonne Elliman’s ‘Stay with me Baby’. Dance-floor-fillers, classic songs, played with commitment passion and love. 

PUT ON YOUR DANCING SHOES

THIS IS A STANDING GIG

By richardhatfield |

Catfish Keith   

Cutting-edge blues singer, songwriter and bottleneck slide guitarist Catfish Keith has established himself as one of the most exciting country blues performers of our time. Catfish’s innovative style of foot-stomping, deep delta blues and American roots music has spellbound audiences the world over.  He has reinvented the guitar with great power and artistry, and brings a rare beauty and vitality to his music.

A three-time Blues Music award nominee for ‘Best Acoustic Blues Album’, both Catfish’s Honey Hole and Mississippi River Blues albums were considered for three Grammy nominations. Catfish has 17 chart-topping albums to his credit, and packs houses all over the world with his dynamic stage shows. A 2008 inductee into the Iowa Blues Hall of Fame, the 40 year veteran has performed thousands of gigs, toured the USA, UK and Europe, headlined major music festivals, and appeared with legends John Lee Hooker, Ray Charles, Robert Cray, Koko Taylor, Taj Mahal, Leo Kottke, Jessie Mae Hemphill, Johnny Shines and many others.

Handing down the tradition, Catfish continues his lifelong journey as one of the brightest lights in acoustic blues and roots music.

“Catfish lays down a foot-stomping groove…one of the most exciting guitarists of any genre”  Acoustic Guitar

By richardhatfield |

12 Silk Handkerchiefs

Reg Meuross Presents 12 Silk Handkerchiefs, Songs & Storytelling

Reg Meuross’s moving work of social and political history, inspired by Brian W. Lavery’s book The Headscarf Revolutionaries, opens a window on Hull’s Hessle Road fishing community and fighting fishwife Lillian Billoca’s successful campaign for improved trawler safety in the aftermath of the 1968 Triple Trawler Disaster.

Joined on stage by Hull musicians Mick McGarry and Sam Martyn, Reg’s powerful songs are interwoven with narration from Brian W. Lavery and rare archive footage from the time the ships went down.

Supported using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England

“Meuross has achieved something rare and important… and he has done so with great sincerity and emotional depth.” Folk Radio UK

“Powerful and moving songwriting” The Telegraph

By richardhatfield |

Angela Barnes

Angela Barnes: Rose-Tinted

Following another sell-out run at the Edinburgh Fringe, Angela Barnes (Live at the Apollo, Mock The Week, BBC 2’s Insert Name Here, BBC R4’s The News Quiz and host of The Comedy Club and Newsjack on BBC R4Extra) is back with her brand new show Rose-Tinted. With stand up and stories, Angela is trying, really trying, to look on the bright side of life.

“Feels like a sure-fire bet the instant she utters her opening lines.” The Scotsman,

“She’s just a gloriously down-to-earth, straight talking and extremely funny comic” The Guardian

“The pace is fast, the material strong and the delivery perfect” Chortle

By richardhatfield |